Symptoms and Markers For Dyslexia

Dyslexia can manifest itself in a number of ways and differently across a wide cross section of people. Symptoms vary from one child to another with age being a core mitigator. Generally, symptoms will present as issues with fluency and accuracy in basic reading and spelling skills.

A key sign that a child may be dyslexic is challenges with decoding words. Decoding refers to the ability to map sounds and letters that allow people to read fluently and with accuracy.

An underlying cause of the challenge to decode words is a concurrent struggle with a basic language skill called phonemic awareness which is the ability to recognize individual sounds in words. Markers indicating a problem with these skills can surface as early on as pre-school in some students.

However, it is common that these issues are not recognized until far later in a child's academic career. By that point other symptoms may be prevalent including difficulties with grammar, reading comprehension, reading fluency, sentence structure and more in-depth writing.

The impact of these symptoms as students struggle in school will often lead to lower self-esteem, a dislike of school, and feelings that they are not "smart enough." It is this consequence that is arguably the biggest negative marker for dyslexia, as it is well known that dyslexic children are among the most intelligent students.

 Helping A Dyslexic Child

 Step One is always an initial diagnosis. Like any other mystery, once the problem has been identified it is then much more clear what the options are for solutions. The CDC-Boston North’s tutoring program uses the Orton-Gillingham method to help students learn skills to help them improve their reading ability, build self-esteem and fully harness their creative nature. Please visit our programs page to learn more about CDC-Boston North's tutoring solutions for dyslexic students.